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DermaWand Review: Can Radio Waves Reduce Wrinkles?

DermaWand Review: Can Radio Waves Reduce Wrinkles?


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Read our Editorial Guidelines to learn more about what makes our site the premier resource for online health information.


Read our Editorial Guidelines to learn more about what makes our site the premier resource for online health information.

DermaWand is a hardware cosmetic device with an interesting premise: that radiofrequency waves applied to the skin can reduce wrinkles. The brand even goes so far as to claim their device is “anti-aging”.

In this article we’ll review medical research to determine if the DermaWand is likely to be effective or if it’s just marketing hype.

Misleading Clinical Study

DermaWand claims that their product is “clinically proven” and we find that statement to be misleading.

The one single “study” testing their product’s effect on skin was a sponsored study and was not published in any medical journal.

The scientific community usually refers to research published in medical journals as “clinical” because there is a high standard of ethics and data quality involved. If a company publishes a study in a respected medical journal proving that their product works, that’s strong clinical evidence that the product works.

A company paying some third-party research organization to test their product is an inherently biased process and is not “clinical” research in any meaningful sense of the term, and it’s a process with so much inherent bias that we consider the results to be useless for qualifying the efficacy of the product.

Put simply, any company could pay a for-profit research firm to test their product enough times until it’s proven to work.

Lacking Technical Information

DermaWand doesn’t appear to publish anywhere on their site the actual frequency or power of their device. Without this information, it’s nearly impossible for consumers (or researchers like us) to determine whether the device is likely to work. Even their technical PDF document on product pages doesn’t appear to include this information.

The frequency and power determine the effects of a radio wave device.

Your cellphone releases radio waves too, but no one would claim it has skin-promoting effects.

For DermaWand to not make this information abundantly clear is really amateur and unscientific in our opinion.

Can Radio Waves Reduce Wrinkles?

Since DermaWand doesn’t seem to publish any relevant technical specifications, we can still analyze medical research on similar devices and their effects on skin appearance.

A thorough medical review published in a Brazilian dermatology journal analyzed 31 individual studies on radiofrequency and its effects on skin.

The researchers concluded that while there were some potential biological mechanisms by which radiofrequency could reduce wrinkles, there weren’t clear specifications on what power level was effective, as this varied greatly between studies. The researchers also noted that many of the trials were poorly designed.

The review ended by stating that “it is clear that using radiofrequency for the treatment of skin laxity is still a myth to be clarified”.

A more recent medical review, published in 2020, concluded similarly. The study authors reviewed 25 full-text articles from medical journals on radiofrequency in the treatment of skin aging, and noted that “there was no consistency in the protocols used and in the description of procedures.”

The researchers from the second-linked study also noted that hyperpigmentation was a side effect in some of the studies.

Based on the research we don’t believe that DermaWand is likely to be effective for improving skin. There isn’t nearly enough standardization of procedure or proof that radiofrequency works at all, and without the relevant technical specs of the DermaWand there’s no way for consumers to determine whether it will work.

Better Natural Alternative

Since one of the main stated benefits of radiofrequency cosmetic treatment is influencing collagen synthesis, we believe that taking a collagen supplement would be a safer and more effective method of improving skin quality.

As we discussed in our Dermal Repair Complex review, it’s proven in medical research that collagen supplementation increases collagen in the body and improves skin quality.

Collagen is a cheap and safe dietary supplement; it’s just a type of protein.

We recommend plain, unflavored collagen sourced from grass-fed animals at a dose of 10 grams (g) daily, which is likely the maximally-effective dose based on medical research.

The effects of collagen supplementation are not immediate; most medical studies on the compound have a duration of weeks or months. 

Collagen should be consumed on an empty stomach for maximum absorption and utilization. It’s a great addition to a water or coffee first thing in the morning.

Stay up-to-date on our research reviews

Conclusion

We don’t recommend DermaWand as we don’t believe there is any legitimate medical research proving it to be effective. The study funded by the brand was published by a for-profit research firm and was not published in any medical journals.

General medical research on radiofrequency for skin appearance has mixed and unimpressive results, and while this type of treatment may be legitimized by further medical studies, currently there are no clear standards on device type or frequency used to recommend any specific device.

We believe that taking an oral collagen supplement would be a cheaper, healthier, safer and more effective method of improving skin appearance than using the DermaWand. We recommend plain, unflavored collagen at a dose of 10 g for improving skin health, as this is one of the most well-established supplements for cosmetic enhancement in legitimate clinical research.





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