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Goli Ashwagandha Gummies Review: Can They Reduce Stress?

Goli Ashwagandha Gummies Review: Can They Reduce Stress?


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Read our Editorial Guidelines to learn more about what makes our site the premier resource for online health information.


Read our Editorial Guidelines to learn more about what makes our site the premier resource for online health information.

Goli makes the most popular gummy supplements, and they recently launched a line of ashwagandha gummies. We already reviewed Goli’s Apple Cider Vinegar Gummies, so we wanted to do a similar research-based review of Goli Ashwagandha Gummies.

In this article we’ll review the formulation of Goli Ashwagandha Gummies based on medical research to determine if the product is likely to be effective or if it’s a waste of money.

Ingredient Review

Goli Ashwagandha Gummies ingredients

Goli Ashwagandha Gummies have one main active ingredient: 300 milligrams (mg) of ashwagandha root extract. Goli uses a patented version called KSM-66 which is generally a good practice because patented versions of herbal extracts tend to be more standardized than generic extracts, meaning the quality is more consistent in our experience.

The brand claims that their gummies can help you “relax” and “unwind”; essentially claiming that they have an anti-stress effect and benefit those with anxiety.

Ashwagandha is proven in medical research to be an effective anxiolytic (anxiety-reduction) supplement, and unlike their ACV gummies this product appears to be effectively dosed.

A clinical trial published in the Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine found that KSM-66 at the exact same dose as that in Goli Ashwagandha decreased stress and improved quality of life in trial participants.

A more recent study found similar results. Patients taking KSM-66 ashwagandha reported reduced stress and anxiety. This study used two different doses: 250 mg and 600 mg. The group taking the higher dose achieved greater benefit.

We can conclude from the above-linked research that Goli Ashwagandha is likely to be at least somewhat effective for stress on average, but that a higher dose may be more beneficial.

One benefit of trying ashwagandha for anxiety as opposed to pharmaceutical anxiety pills like Cymbalta is that it has a fantastic safety profile. Ashwagandha is non-toxic at doses used in medical literature. Both of the medical trials on ashwagandha that we reviewed reported no major adverse events, and neither reporter that the group taking ashwagandha had greater side effects than the placebo group, effectively proving that KSM-66 ashwagandha at a safe dose has no side effects.

Vitamin D2 is another active ingredient in Goli Ashwagandha Gummies, and we find this to be a very strange inclusion. Vitamin D2 is significantly less effective at raising Vitamin D levels than Vitamin D3, which is why even the cheapest supplement manufacturers today mostly use D3.

In fact, Vitamin D2 is such a low-quality vitamin supplement that there’s even an entire medical review published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition arguing that it “shouldn’t even be regarded as a nutrient suitable for supplementation” because it’s so poorly absorbed and subject to rapid degradation. 

In our opinion, the fact that Goli includes Vitamin D2 rather than Vitamin D3 is a sign that their formulators are relatively incompetent. We haven’t even reviewed another supplement containing this form of Vitamin D.

One concerning aspect of Goli Ashwagandha Gummies is they contain 4 grams (g) of added sugar per serving. This is a relatively small amount, but as we’ve stated in many other gummy reviews (like our analysis of Olly Vitamins), it simply makes no logical sense to purchase an expensive health product with an ingredient known to be harmful to human health in excess.

Added sugar is one of the few food ingredients that’s conclusively proven to be damaging to human health, and we recommend avoiding it entirely and getting sugars from fruits and whole foods.

Goli Ashwgandha also contains natural flavors which is an essentially unregulated ingredient we recommend avoiding, and citric acid which is a preservative that may cause inflammation based on some medical case reports.

Overall we believe that the formulation of Goli Ashwagandha is superior to their ACV gummies because there is at least one effectively dosed ingredient, but we wouldn’t recommend the product due to the questionable additives.

Better Alternative

Since KSM-66 ashwagandha appears to be the only ingredient in an effective dose and form in Goli Ashwagandha Gummies, consumers interested in the benefits of ashwagandha may want to consider taking a KSM-66 ashwagandha product without all of the additives in Goli.

Taking an ashwagandha capsule or powder may confer the benefits of the herb without the potential health risks of added sugars and flavoring agents.

Since ashwagandha is an herbal supplement often grown in India where there is relatively high environmental pollution, we recommend that consumers ask the supplement manufacturer for third-party testing before purchasing a KSM-66 ashwagandha supplement.

You want to ensure that the supplement is not high in heavy metals such as lead and arsenic, and only independent testing can prove this. High-quality supplement brands pay for independent testing of their products to ensure they’re safe.

Stay up-to-date on our research reviews

Conclusion

We don’t recommend Goli Ashwagandha Gummies because of the inclusion of Vitamin D2 and additives. The KSM-66 ashwagandha they used appears to be effectively dosed for stress reduction, but a 600 mg daily dose may be superior based on medical research. 

Consumers interested in the benefits of ashwagandha should look for a KSM-66 ashwagandha supplement at 300 mg or 600 mg daily, without any questionable additives. Make sure that the supplement manufacturer can provide third-party test results proving their product is safe. If they cannot, we recommend avoiding the brand.





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