Infinity Hoop Review: The Ultimate Waist Workout?

Infinity Hoop Review: The Ultimate Waist Workout?


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Infinity Hoop is a weighted hula hoop brand that’s popular on TikTok, and that is so certain their product can cause weight loss that the brand offers a money-back guarantee to customers who don’t lose two inches of waist circumference in the first month.

But can weighted hula hooping really cause weight loss? Is it healthier and does it burn more calories than regular hula hooping? And how do real users rate the Infinity Hoop?

In this article we’ll answer all of these questions and more as we review clinical studies on weighted hula hooping to determine if it can cause weight loss, explain whether we consider the Infinity Hoop a waste of money compared to regular hula hooping and share real, unsponsored user reviews of the Infinity Hoop.

Does Weighted Hula Hooping Cause Weight Loss?

Weighted hula hooping has actually been studied in clinical trials for its effects on weight and health overall.

A clinical trial published in the Obesity Facts journal compared the effects of weighted hula hooping and walking in overweight subjects.

After six weeks, those using the weighted hula hoop lost more weight (1.32 pounds), lost significantly more abdominal fat and decreased waist circumference significantly more (1.22 inches) compared with the walking group.

This makes sense intuitively, because weighted hula hooping is a more intense form of exercise than walking, but it’s still useful to see it borne out in a research trial.

Another clinical trial examined the effects of weighted hula hooping, and found that after six weeks the average waist circumference decreased by 1.34 inches. There was no change in body weight, but there was also no reference to the trial participants being overweight or obese.

A 2020 medical study found that weighted hula hooping may reduce the risk of breast cancer due to its favorable effects on metabolism.

Overall it appears based on clinical studies (and logic) that weighted hula hooping can cause weight loss. We don’t know where Infinity Hoop got their “2 inches in 30 days” metric from, and we consider this to be a marketing claim rather than a scientific claim because it’s uncited and we can’t identify any clinical research suggesting that significant of a decrease in waist circumference should be expected in only 30 days.

Real, Unsponsored User Review of Infinity Hoop

One of the most popular YouTube reviews of Infinity Hoop is published by a creator named “Christine’s ChaoZ.” She does an unboxing, a product demo, and explains her (negative) results with the Infinity Hoop after 30 days of use:

Infinity Hoop Before and After

The only video we could find on the Infinity Hoop including before-and-after images is published by a TikTok creator named Brittany Berrier Barnes:

@brittanyberrierba 30 day challenge results! #AerieREAL #infinityhoop #OutlanderChallenge #SchickAsks #SmoothLikeNitroPepsi #TheAdamProject #fypシ #LinkBudsNeverOff ♬ Believer - Imagine Dragons

 

Infinity Hoop Vs. Regular Hula Hoop for Weight Loss

Consumers are often curious about whether the Infinity Hoop is worth the money: is it better than a regular hula hoop for weight loss?

While there have been no clinical studies testing this, we do believe that the Infinity Hoop is likely to be more efficient for weight loss because it’s a weighted hoop. Adding resistance to any exercise increases calories burned.

It’s possible to lose weight doing any form of exercise and no money is required, but the more intense the exercise, the more weight can be lost in shorter periods of time.

One of the benefits of the Infinity Hoop for weight loss, according to many of the reviewers, is that it can make exercise fun. Ultimately it’s up to each individual to find out what type of exercise they enjoy and just stick to it on a consistent basis. You can lose weight using the Infinity Hoop, you can lose weight walking and you can lose weight running. Consistency is the most important thing.

Our Clean Weight Loss Picks

There are food-based nutrients which have been shown in medical studies to be effective for weight loss.

Dietary fiber was shown in a medical review published in The Journal of Nutrition to cause 16 pounds of weight loss in 6 months when combined with moderate caloric restriction (750 calories per day below baseline).

MBG Organic Fiber Potency+ is our top fiber pick because it's certified organic, provides 7 g of fiber per serving and costs under $1.85 per serving at the time of updating this article.

MCT oil was shown in a meta-study to cause more than one pound of weight loss over 10 weeks. This equates to potential annualized weight loss of 6 pounds per year with less than one tablespoon's worth of MCT oil per day.

Bulletproof MCT Oil is our top MCT oil product, because the only ingredient is MCT oil derived from coconuts. and it currently costs only $15.50 for over a month's worth of product.

Ginger intake "significantly decreased body weight" according to a 2019 meta-study on ginger and weight loss that analyzed data from 14 clinical trials.

Pique La Ginger is our top ginger product, because it's an organic tea in convenient crystallized form, and all that's needed is to pour the powder into a glass and add hot water.

All three of the products mentioned in this section are entirely free of additive ingredients that we consider to be unhealthy or unsafe.

Stay up-to-date on our research reviews

Conclusion

Infinity Hoop is likely to cause a decrease in waist circumference and body weight in overweight individuals, because weighted hula hoop exercise is proven to do so in clinical studies.

Any resistance exercise performed on a consistent basis can be effective for weight loss, but if the Infinity Hoop makes exercise more fun and helps someone be more consistent with their exercise routine, then it’s worth the purchase in our opinion given that it costs under $100.

We do believe that the Infinity Hoop is likely to be more effective for weight loss than regular hula hooping, because the added weights increase calories burned.

We also consider the “links” on the Infinity Hoop to be a smart marketing strategy, and to potentially help motivate people to continue exercising.

Once someone is able to remove their first “links,” they have visual proof that the hoop is helping them lose weight in a way that’s more tangible than most workouts. It’s clever and plays into human psychology to promote better health.

Users online seem to have mostly favorable reviews about the Infinity Hoop.