Noocube Review: Powerful Nootropic or Overrated?

Noocube Review: Powerful Nootropic or Overrated?


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Noocube is a nootropic supplement that describes itself as a “Brain Productivity” supplement. The brand’s website claims that their supplement can not only cause users to “gain razor sharp focus” but also to “boost memory & mental alertness.”

But does Noocube contain ingredients shown to have these effects in clinical studies, or are these just marketing claims? Does the supplement contain any questionable additive ingredients? Where’s the best place to buy it? And how do real users rate and describe Noocube's effects?

In this article we’ll answer all of these questions and more, as analyze the ingredients in Noocube based on clinical studies to give our take on whether or not it's likely to boost memory and focus.

We'll feature unsponsored customer reviews of the brand, explain where the safest place to buy it is, and discuss the potential for side effects.

Ingredient Analysis

Noocube vitamin ingredients

The vitamin ingredients listed in Noocube are shown above.

While these vitamins are necessary for optimal brain function, they can be obtained from food and we haven't come across any clinical evidence suggesting that supplemental vitamins have a nootropic effect in individuals who are not deficient in those vitamins.

The remaining active ingredients in Noocube are shown below:

Noocube other active ingredients

Lutemax 2020 is a patented carotenoid blend. We can't find any clinical evidence that this compound has a nootropic effect.

Bacopa monnieri extract is an effective nootropic compound.

A meta-study published in the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine analyzed data on bacopa and cognition, and concluded that bacopa improved memory. The dose in Noocube is similar to some of the doses used in the analyzed clinical trials. 

Cat's claw extract was described as a "potential breakthrough for the natural treatment of both normal brain aging and Alzheimer’s disease" in a medical review published in the Scientific Reports journal.

L-tyrosine is an amino acid that's clinically shown to improve cognitive function, as we documented in our Quantumind review article on another nootropic supplement.

However, we can't find any evidence that it has this effect at the 250 milligram (mg) dose in Noocube. Most of the studies on tyrosine for nootropic effect that we've come across in our research used a dose nearly 10x that high.

L-theanine is an amino acid that has anxiolytic (anxiety-reducing) effects, but we haven’t come across any medical studies suggesting it has nootropic effects unless combined with caffeine.

Resveratrol or pterostilbene are similar compounds, and we can't find research backing for either.

The inactive ingredients in Noocube, shown below, should be entirely safe and non-toxic:

Noocube inactive ingredients

Overall, we consider Noocube somewhat likely to have a nootropic effect, and to boost memory and alertness as the brand suggests, because it has several research-backed ingedients.

The brand has improved this supplement's formulation since we initially published this review. It removed several ingredients we highlighed as potentially underdosed, and also removed Alpha GPC which may have negative cardiovascular effects.

Real People Try Noocube

A YouTube creator named "Your Inception" shares his experience taking Noocube for 30 days, and compares it to other popular nootropics:

A TikTok creator named Wayne Wells reviewed Noocube and claims in the comments that it had no effect on him:

@wellsway0419 #NooCube #BrainProductivity #DoesItWork #MemoryBoost #MentalAlertness #Lutemax #BacopaMonnieri #Bacosides #FYP #Huperzine #Nootropic #Day1 ♬ original sound - Wayne Wells

Does Noocube Cause Side Effects?

Noocube doesn't appear to have been studied in any clinical trials, which makes it more challenging to determine the risk of side effects.

However, we can make an educated guess based on its active ingredients.

Small doses of l-tyrosine "produce [rapid heart beat] and hypertension" according to a medical review published in the European Journal of Pharmacology, but this conclusion is based on animal studies and we haven't seen it replicated in human studies.

Bacopa extract, which is the highest-dosed active ingredient in Noocube, has a favorable safety profile and has been proven safe even at doses over 100x the amount in this supplement, as we documented in our Cerebra review article.

Overall, we do not consider Noocube likely to cause side effects in otherwise healthy adults. This supplement has a better safety profile than the average nootropic supplement that we've reviewed to date on Illuminate Health.

Given the animal study data on l-tyrosine and hypertension, individuals with high blood pressure may benefit from speaking with their doctor prior to taking this supplement.

The brand's website describes the supplement has posesseing "zero known side effects."

Where to Buy Noocube

At the time of updating this article, the brand's website (linked here for convenience) appears to be the only official retailer of Noocube.

There are many products currently being sold under the "Noocube" trade name on third-party retailers like Amazon and Walmart, but none appear to be the official formulation.

As you can see in the image below, the top Amazon results for "Noocube" currently show a totally different brand called "Trimedix" selling under the "Noocube" name:

Noocube Amazon results

However, this product does not contain the same ingredients as we analyzed in the Ingredient Analysis section of this article.

We recommend that consumers be extremely wary of brands selling under a different company's trade name, as this is a sign of a very low-quality brand.

We hope that Noocube files for a registered trademark of their brand name soon, to help protect consumers from potential scams.

Our Clean Nootropic Picks

There are compounds which have been shown in medical studies to be effective for cognitive enhancement and memory support.

MCT oil is a food supplement derived from coconut oil that improved memory recall by 20% in adults in a 2022 meta-study.

Bulletproof MCT Oil is our top MCT oil pick, because its only ingredient is MCT oil derived from coconuts and it has zero additives. It currently retails for under $16.

Ginkgo biloba extract is arguably the most well-studied nootropic supplement apart from caffeine.

medical review published in the Psychopharmacology journal found that ginkgo biloba supplementation improved attention and cognitive performance in healthy, young adults.

Illuminate Labs Ginkgo Biloba Extract is our supplement which is third-party tested to ensure purity and label accuracy, and retails for only $15 at a subscription price.

Panax ginseng extract is another well-studied nootropic supplement. A 2013 clinical trial found that ginseng extract caused "overwhelmingly positive effects on neurocognitive function across different cognitive domains."

Illuminate Labs Panax Ginseng Extract is our supplement which is third-party tested to ensure purity and label accuracy, and retails for only $15 at a subscription price.

Pros and Cons of Noocube

Here are the pros and cons of Noocube in our opinion:

Pros:

  • Contains several research-backed active ingredients
  • Safe inactive ingredients
  • Should support brain health
  • Should support memory
  • Free shipping on brand's website
  • Unlikely to cause side effects in otherwise healthy adults
  • Stimulant-free

Cons:

  • L-tyrosine may have negative cardiovascular effects
  • Doesn't appear clinically tested
  • Many different brands selling under this same trade name which creates confusion
Stay up-to-date on our research reviews

Conclusion

Noocube has updated their formulation since we initially published this article, and we consider the new formulation to be a significant improvement.

This supplement contains some research-backed and effectively-dosed active ingredients, and we consider it somewhat likely to have a nootropic effect.

There are no ingredients in this formulation that we consider to be unsafe.

Noocube doesn't appear to be clinically tested, but we don't believe it's likely to cause side effects, and it's stimulant-free which is a good thing for sensitive consumers.

There are many different brands selling supplements called "Noocube" on Amazon and Walmart at the time of updating this article, but none appear to be the official retailer.

We hope that Noocube files for a registered trademark in the near future to eliminate this potential confusion.

The brand's website appears to be the only official retailer of this supplement, which currently sells for $64.99 per bottle for a one-time purchase.