Bucked Up Pre-Workout Review: Effectively-Dosed Stimulant?

Bucked Up Pre-Workout Review: Effectively-Dosed Stimulant?


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Disclaimer: None of the information in this article constitutes medical advice. All statements are merely the opinion of the writer(s). We recommend that patients follow their doctor’s guidance in regard to pre-workout supplements.

Bucked Up Pre-Workout is a keto pre-workout product. The brand suggests that it’s potent, stating on their website that “you won’t find ineffective doses of any ingredients.”

But does Bucked Up Pre-Workout actually contain research-backed ingredient doses or is this just a marketing claim? Does it contain any questionable additive ingredients? What retailer sells this supplement for the best price? And how do real users rate and describe the effects of Bucked Up Pre-Workout?

In this article we’ll answer all of these questions and more as we analyze the ingredients in Bucked Up Pre-Workout based on medical studies to give our take on whether the supplement is likely to be effective or if it’s a waste of money.

We’ll provide a cost comparison featuring the retailer that sells this product the cheapest, and feature real, unsponsored Bucked Up Pre-Workout user reviews.

Ingredient Analysis

Bucked Up Pre-Workout ingredients

The ingredients in the Breezy Blast flavor of Bucked Up Pre-Workout are shown above.

There are some effectively-dosed active ingredients for physical and mental performance benefits.

Caffeine is included at a 200 milligram (mg) dose, and a medical review published in the Sports Medicine journal found that caffeine increases power output and reduces physical and mental fatigue during exercise. The amount in Bucked Up is an effective dose, equivalent to around two cups of coffee.

Beta-alanine is frequently included in pre-workout supplements and for good reason. As we documented in our review of another supplement containing this ingredient called Mr Hyde Pre Workout, beta alanine is clinically shown to increase power at a minimum dose of 1,000 mg, so the amount in Bucked Up (2,000 mg) is effectively dosed.

Citrulline malate is a nitric oxide precursor, meaning it can improve blood flow and stamina. A meta-study published in the European Journal of Applied Physiology reports that citrulline malate supplementation prior to exercise reduced muscle soreness by 40% after 24 hours.

Alpha GPC appears to be an effective ergogenic (exercise-enhancing) aid, but may be slightly underdosed in Bucked Up. A 2015 clinical trial found that Alpha GPC supplementation at a daily dose of 600 mg increased lower body force production, but the dose in Bucked Up is only 200 mg.

We cannot find any trials proving a 200 mg Alpha GPC dose is effective, nor does the brand cite any on their product page.

Taurine is an amino acid that can help prevent muscle damage caused by exercise, but at a 3,000 mg dose according to a 2017 clinical trial. The 100 mg dose in Bucked Up is relatively low for an amino acid.

Clearly Bucked Up Pre-Workout contains some effectively dosed active ingredients, but it also contains a few additive ingredients that we consider questionable from a health perspective.

Sucralose is an artificial sweetener which is clinically shown to negatively impact insulin function in healthy adults even at only 15% of the Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) level.

Artificial flavors have no nutritive value and are shown to be highly toxic in animal studies.

Natural flavors, while healthier than artificial flavors in our opinion, is a broad categorical term that fails to describe the specific flavoring agents used. Without this information it’s hard to assess ingredient safety.

Overall we consider Bucked Up Pre-Workout likely to improve physical and mental performance in the gym, but we would not recommend it due to the additive ingredients.

We Tried Bucked Up Ourselves

Bucked Up Pre-Workout UGC

One of our product testers named Matt Donnelly tried Bucked Up. Here's his experience:

The product comes sealed under the lid and removing the seal was not difficult. Inside, you may need to dig around for the plastic scoop.

My main issue with the packaging was that the text on the container was so small it was very difficult to read. I wanted to make sure I was using the product correctly, but I needed to go to the website to get directions because it was too small to read on the container.

I tried “Blue Razz” and the taste was similar to a blue raspberry lollipop.

The product helped boost my energy for my workout, specifically in terms of endurance. I was able to push through the last part of my workout with more ease when I would generally start to feel winded.

About 15 minutes after consuming this pre-workout supplement, I started to feel a very unexpected tingling sensation on the surface of my skin.

After the first try, I thought maybe there could have been another reason for this, but when I tried it the second time I experienced the same tingling sensation. While the product may work as intended, I felt that I did not want to ingest anything into my body that would cause this sensation, so I stopped using it after the second use.

Overall, I would rate Bucked Up Pre-Workout 5/10 and I do not plan to purchase it in the future.

Will Bucked Up Cause Side Effects?

Bucked Up doesn’t appear to have been studied in any clinical trials, so we can’t say for certain whether or not it will cause side effects. However, we can make an educated guess based on its ingredients.

Caffeine is a stimulant and can cause jitters and anxiety in sensitive individuals. We’d recommend that individuals with anxiety avoid this supplement (and any other stimulatory pre-workouts).

Artificial flavors may cause hyperactivity according to a medical review published in the Neurotherapeutics journal.

Overall we consider pre-workout supplements more likely to cause side effects than the average supplement category, due to their stimulatory nature and additive ingredients, but we do not consider Bucked Up more likely than the average pre-workout to do so, nor do we consider Bucked Up likely to cause side effects in the average healthy adult.

Real People Try Bucked Up

A fitness influencer named Brett Westover has a review of Bucked Up Pre-Workout that rates its effects like “energy” and “pump” on a scale of 1-10:

A TikTok user named Wes stoeklin reviews the product on a similar rating scale:

@wes.stoecklin What should I try next? #gymtok #gym #fyp #workout #bodybuilding #lifting #4u #preworkout #preworkoutreview #buckedup ♬ Rocking A Cardigan in Atlanta - lil Shordie Scott

Where to Buy Bucked Up for the Best Price

Bucked Up Pre-Workout is sold at a variety of online retailers. Here’s a price breakdown at the time of publishing this article:

GNC: $49.99 (link)

Brand website: $49.95 (plus shipping, link)

Swanson: $49.95 (link)

Amazon: $44.77 (free shippinglink to official Amazon listing)

This pre-workout supplement is currently 10% cheaper on Amazon than the second-cheapest retailer.

Can Pre-Workouts Be Dangerous?

Pre-workouts can be a safe way to improve exercise performance for healthy adults, but it’s important to avoid taking too high of a dose. This interesting video from the “Chubbyemu” channel has over 6 million views and explains what happened when a TikToker took eight scoops of pre-workout:

Real Customers Review Bucked Up

Amazon is a better resource for honest customer reviews than a brand’s website in our opinion.

Bucked Up has been reviewed over 4,600 times on Amazon with an average review rating of 4.6 out of 5 stars.

The top positive review from a verified purchaser comes from an anonymous Amazon Customer who claims the supplement improves their physical and mental performance:

“When I take this, I'm a different person. I become an animal. Focus 110%. It doesn't matter what kind of day I had or whats going on around me. I push myself to the max, my recovery is quick, and my set volume is higher due to a combination of the pump and the decreased rest time (due to high focus).”

The top negative review from a verified purchaser is written by a user named “Angie B.” who claims to have found chunks of plastic in the product:

“I found small chunks of plastic in it and didn’t give me the option to return. Does nothing tbh a redbull will give you more wings then this. Aside of flavor I’d recommend you find other alternatives.”

Our Clean Pre-Workout Picks

The pre-workout supplement we recommend is Naked Energy by Naked Nutrition.

Like Bucked Up, it provides an effective dose of beta alanine and caffeine for power and stamina improvements.

The main difference is that it’s entirely free of questionable additive ingredients like artificial sweeteners and artificial colors. There are no inactive ingredients in this formulation at all, which makes it the healthiest pre-workout formulation on the market in our opinion.

Interested consumers can check out Naked Energy at this link to its product page on the official brand website.

Panax ginseng is clinically shown to reduce mental fatigue (source) and reduce physical fatigue (source). It’s one of the most popular herbal supplements in the world.

Illuminate Labs sells a Panax Ginseng extract supplement for only $15 on a subscription basis which is highly potent (minimum 8% ginsenosides) and is third-party tested to ensure label accuracy and purity. Interested consumers can check out Illuminate Labs Panax Ginseng Extract at this link to the product page on our website.

Pros and Cons of Bucked Up

Here are the pros and cons of Bucked Up Pre-Workout in our opinion:

Pros:

  • Likely to improve physical performance
  • Likely to improve mental performance
  • Most active ingredients effectively dosed
  • Naturally colored

Cons:

  • Contains artificial sweetener
  • Contains artificial flavors
  • Contains natural flavors
  • May cause anxiety in sensitive individuals
Stay up-to-date on our research reviews

Conclusion

Bucked Up Pre-Workout contains a number of research-backed active ingredients included at effective doses. We consider this supplement likely to improve physical and mental performance at the gym, and for consumers who are exclusively focused on performance outcomes, it may be a good pick.

We don’t currently recommend this supplement due to the inclusion of several inactive ingredients we consider questionable from a health perspective, including sucralose (an artificial sweetener) and artificial flavoring agents.

Bucked Up may cause side effects like anxiety in sensitive individuals due to the caffeine, but that’s a risk with any stimulatory pre-workout product. We do not consider this supplement more likely than the average pre-workout to cause side effects, nor do we think it’s likely to cause side effects in the average, healthy adult.

Online reviews of Bucked Up are mostly favorable, and for consumers intent on purchasing this product, doing so on Amazon will save you at least 10% at the time of publishing this article.